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MASCC-Endorsed Practice Guidelines

Guideline for the Prevention and Treatment of Anticipatory Nausea and Vomiting Due to Chemotherapy in Pediatric Cancer Patients
The Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO) has published "Guideline for the Prevention and Treatment of Anticipatory Nausea and Vomiting due to Chemotherapy in Pediatric Cancer Patients” (April 2014). This evidence-based guideline contains recommendations for optimizing control of anticipatory nausea and vomiting  in children from 1 month to 18 years of age who are receiving chemotherapy. Recommendations for both pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are included.  >> Read the Guideline

*Disclaimer* The evidence used in formulating this guideline was rated as "low level" by the authors and much of it was derived from evidence in the adult population, rather than a pediatric population. While the conclusions have face validity, the strength of the recommendations is limited by a dearth of high-quality data. There remains a need for more studies in the pediatric population.


Acute AINV Guideline for Pediatric Cancer Patients
The Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO) has published “Guideline for the Prevention of Acute Nausea and Vomiting due to Antineoplastic Medication in Pediatric Cancer Patients” (April 2014). The purpose of this guideline is to provide healthcare providers with an approach to the prevention of acute antineoplastic-induced nausea and vomiting (AINV) in children. The scope is limited to the prevention of AINV in the acute phase (within 24 hours of antineoplastic administration).  >> Quick Review Summary


International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline
The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids.ca) published “Guideline for the Management of Fever and Neutropenia in Children With Cancer and/or Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation” (September, 2012). Fever and neutropenia (FN) are common complications in children who receive chemotherapy for cancer. A panel of pediatric cancer and infectious disease experts developed an evidence-based guideline for empiric management of pediatric FN. The guideline focuses on children and adolescents with cancer and those with FN who are undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Implementing the guideline requires adaptation to the local context and must take into account organizational barriers, such as available local infrastructure to support different models of care.