Research Highlights
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Hemostasis

Incidental Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients on Routine CT Scans

In a prospective cohort study, Carmen Escalante et al. investigated the prevalence of incidental venous thromboemtolism (VTE) in almost 1100 adult cancer patients on routine staging CT scans of the chest, abdomen, or pelvis. The research team also documented symptoms associated with incidental VTEs and determined the incidence of VTE recurrence in these patients after 3 and 6 months.

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Hemostasis

The Clinical Course of Venous Thromboembolism May Differ With Cancer Site

Carme Font is one of a large group of investigators who have collaborated on a study of differences in the clinical course of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in relation to specific cancer sites. The study included data from almost 4000 adult patients with active cancer. Significant differences in the clinical profile of VTE-related outcomes were associated with tumor location. The findings suggest that individualized anticoagulation strategies for cancer-related VTE could improve outcomes and quality of life, while reducing treatment costs.

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Rehabilitation, Survivorship & Quality of Life

Exercise, Quality of Life, and Physical Function in Patients with Cancer

MASCC members Paul Jacobsen (Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida) and Irma Verdonck-de Leeuw (VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) were among the many collaborators on a large-scale meta-analysis (Buffart et al., 2017) designed to evaluate the effects of exercise on quality of life and physical function in adult cancer patients.1 The study also aimed to determine the extent to which demographic, clinical, exercise, and other intervention-related variables moderated the main effects. The analysis included 34 randomized controlled trials that involved more than 4,500 adult cancer patients and that evaluated the effects of exercise on quality of life and physical function. Exercise was found to significantly improve both quality of life and physical function. These effects were unaffected by differences in demographic, clinical, and exercise variables, such as age, sex, education level, marital status, BMI, cancer type, metastatic stage, and treatment. Also, exercise was equally effective during and following cancer treatment.

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Fatigue

The Search for Mechanisms Underlying Fatigue Through Gene Expression Profiling

Kord Kober, PhD, is this year’s winner of the Fatigue Study Group’s Junior Investigator Award for his research on gene expression profiling of inflammation and immune response pathways in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. In July, Kord and his colleagues, including MASCC members Christine Miaskowski and Judy Mastick, published their paper, “Gene Expression Profiling of Evening Fatigue in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer,” in Biological Research for Nursing. The report contains extensive details regarding methodology and gene expression analyses that we cannot include here, but the paper is available for free download.*

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Antiemetics

2016 MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines Update

The MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines have been updated as of March, 2016, and a slide set summarizing the consensus process and recommendations is now available. The guidelines are based on the Copenhagen Consensus Conference on Antiemetic Therapy, June 2015, and have been endorsed by both MASCC and ESMO. This set of evidence-based guidelines represents several important changes and first-time inclusions. 

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