Research Highlights
Print Email

Rehabilitation, Survivorship & Quality of Life

Exercise, Quality of Life, and Physical Function in Patients with Cancer

MASCC members Paul Jacobsen (Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida) and Irma Verdonck-de Leeuw (VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) were among the many collaborators on a large-scale meta-analysis (Buffart et al., 2017) designed to evaluate the effects of exercise on quality of life and physical function in adult cancer patients.1 The study also aimed to determine the extent to which demographic, clinical, exercise, and other intervention-related variables moderated the main effects. The analysis included 34 randomized controlled trials that involved more than 4,500 adult cancer patients and that evaluated the effects of exercise on quality of life and physical function. Exercise was found to significantly improve both quality of life and physical function. These effects were unaffected by differences in demographic, clinical, and exercise variables, such as age, sex, education level, marital status, BMI, cancer type, metastatic stage, and treatment. Also, exercise was equally effective during and following cancer treatment.

Read more...
 
Print Email

Fatigue

The Search for Mechanisms Underlying Fatigue Through Gene Expression Profiling

Kord Kober, PhD, is this year’s winner of the Fatigue Study Group’s Junior Investigator Award for his research on gene expression profiling of inflammation and immune response pathways in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. In July, Kord and his colleagues, including MASCC members Christine Miaskowski and Judy Mastick, published their paper, “Gene Expression Profiling of Evening Fatigue in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer,” in Biological Research for Nursing. The report contains extensive details regarding methodology and gene expression analyses that we cannot include here, but the paper is available for free download.*

Read more...
 
Print Email

Antiemetics

2016 MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines Update

The MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines have been updated as of March, 2016, and a slide set summarizing the consensus process and recommendations is now available. The guidelines are based on the Copenhagen Consensus Conference on Antiemetic Therapy, June 2015, and have been endorsed by both MASCC and ESMO. This set of evidence-based guidelines represents several important changes and first-time inclusions. 

Read more...
 
Print Email

Palliative Care

Integration of Oncology and Palliative Care Programs: An International Consensus

Study Group members initiated a Delphi survey (three iterations) to develop an international consensus on indicators for the integration of specialty palliative care and oncology programs for hospitalized advanced cancer patients. Respondents reached consensus on 13 major and 30 minor indicators. Major indicators were related to clinical structure (e.g., presence of palliative care inpatient team), processes (e.g., early palliative care referral), outcomes (e.g., median time from diagnosis to palliative care consultation), and education (e.g., routine rotation of oncology fellows to palliative care). The results can be used to identify centers with a high level of integration and to facilitate benchmarking, quality improvement, and research. 

Read more...
 
Print Email

Oral Care

Position Paper: Oral Care for Hematology-Oncology Patients and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

The position paper is a joint project of the Oral Care Study Group and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Group to develop guidance for clinical stuff who provide oral care to patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The paper emphasizes the importance of basic oral care prior to, during, and after chemotherapy/HSCT. The protocol takes a practical approach and is based on the following principles: prevention of infections, pain control, maintaining oral function, and the need to manage oral complications of cancer treatment while improving quality of life.

 
<< first < Prev 1 2 3 Next > last >>

Page 1 of 3