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Supportive Care in Cancer During the COVID-19 Pandemic

2020    RESERVE YOUR PLACE  -  MASCC is offering a FREE webinar, “Supportive care in cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic.” A panel of MASCC experts will lead a virtual discussion on how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts cancer patients and how healthcare professionals can support them during the pandemic. Topics will include next steps after the crisis is resolved; precautions to take in the months ahead with a potential second wave; and impacts on oncology research including ongoing and planned clinical trials.

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Supportive Cancer Care and COVID-19: a new journal article from the MASCC Survivorship Study Group

2020    This month, we are sharing a recent article published by MASCC members in the MASCC journal Supportive Care in Cancer. With the rapidly changing and evolving practice in managing COVID-19, MASCC would like to share information on our members’ professional experiences amongst our community. If you are interested and able to share your professional experiences, advice and advancements during this time of international crisis, we will find a convenient time in your schedule for a brief 30-minute interview. Please contact Angela Perez today at [email protected].

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Managing Cancer Pain in the Opioid Crisis: A Cross-Canada Initiative

2019    The current opioid crisis and efforts to curb it may be contributing to inadequate cancer pain management. This was the core takeaway of the first step in a national initiative in Canada to investigate the impact of the opioid crisis on cancer pain management. Other important insights included the identification of major knowledge gaps, inconsistent reporting of harms, and systems and regulatory impacts that may have significant negative effects on the delivery of cancer pain management.

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Early Detection of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiotoxicity

2019    Anthracycline therapy is a mainstay for breast cancer and many other cancers, but it is associated with a rate of incident heart failure more than five times the average. Preclinical studies of anthracycline-induced myocardial damage show that the substrate for heart failure is myocardial fibrosis preceded by myocardial edema or inflammation. Loss of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may also contribute to myocardial damage. The detection of early changes via blood biomarkers is challenging. However, recently, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has been successfully used to detect post-treatment anthracycline-induced fibrosis through T1 mapping, paralleling a decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).

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Research on Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

2019    Alex Molassiotis and Alex Chan are among the co-authors of a recent study of risk factors for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) among patients receiving taxane-based and platinum-based chemotherapy.1 CIPN is a significant side effect of neurotoxic chemo-therapies and one that is difficult to manage. Although several risk factors for CIPN have been identified, methodological limitations in much past research limit knowledge about such risks. Molassiotis and his colleagues undertook this study to assess the relative contributions of a wider range of potential risk factors than previously studied.

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FDA Approves Rolapitant for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

2015    On September 2, 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved rolapitant (Varubi™) for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Rolapitant, developed by Tesaro, Inc., is a selective and competitive neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist and is relatively long-acting with a half-life of about 7 days). The approval was based on three phase III clinical trials conducted by a research team that included MASCC members Bernardo Rapoport, Martin Chasen, Allen Poma, Lee Schwartzberg, and Rudolph Navari. These randomized, double-blind, controlled trials established the safety and efficacy of rolapitant. The drug was associated with a significant reduction in vomiting and use of rescue antiemetic drugs. Patients treated with rolapitant also reported both fewer episodes of nausea that interfered with their day-to-day life.

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Identifying Patients at Low Risk for FN Complications: Development and Validation of the MASCC Risk Index Score

2015    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a life-threatening complication of cancer chemotherapy and is considered a medical emergency. The classic treatment strategy is broad-spectrum antibiotics administered intravenously in a hospital setting, and most patients respond promptly with no complications.

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